Runaway stars leave infrared waves
Scientists discover why X chromosome lacks...
The Anthropocene: Hard evidence for a...
Safer, faster heart scans in view
Tough times for the tree of life on coral...

First demonstration of a cancer arising from a single cell

Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have, for the first time, visualized the origins of cancer from the first affected cell and watched its spread in a live animal. Their work could change the way scientists understand melanoma and other cancers and could lead to new, early treatments before the cancer has taken hold.

  • 1 Days ago
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Gigantic cloud bounces back to our galaxy

New Hubble telescope observations suggest that a high-velocity gas cloud was launched from the outer regions of our own galaxy around 70 million years ago. Now, the cloud is on a return collision course and is expected to plow into the Milky Way's disk in about 30 million years. Astronomers believe it will ignite a spectacular burst of star formation then.

  • 4 Days ago
  • 19 Views
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Sasikumar
Other

Bio-mimetic Frost free surfaces inspired by Beetles

Researchers made a beetle-inspired surface that uses chemical micropatterns to control the growth of condensation and frost. They were even able to create a surface where inter-droplet ice growth is completely stopped.

  • 9 Days ago
  • 26 Views
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The secret behind how Venus Flytrap hunts its prey - Demystified

Carnivorous plants such as the Venus flytrap depend on meals of insects to survive in nutrient-poor soil. They sense the arrival of juicy insects, lured by the plants' fruity scent, with the aid of sensitive trigger hairs on the inner surfaces of their traps. Now, researchers have looked more closely at exactly how the plants decide when to keep their traps shut and begin producing their acidic, prey-decomposing cocktail of enzymes. The short answer is: th..

  • 13 Days ago
  • 74 Views
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Geckos are 'size limit' for sticking to walls - Oh No! Then what about Spider man?

Latest research reveals why geckos are the largest animals able to scale smooth vertical walls -- even larger climbers would require unmanageably large sticky footpads. Scientists estimate that a human would need adhesive pads covering 40 percent of their body surface in order to walk up a wall like Spiderman, and believe their insights have implications for the feasibility of large-scale, gecko-like adhesives.

  • 14 Days ago
  • 48 Views
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Sasikumar
Other

What is the Universe made of?

The mysterious composition of the enormous Universe still remains an unanswered puzzle. Matter known as ordinary, which makes up everything we know, corresponds to only 5% of the Universe. Approximately half of this percentage still eluded detection. Numerical simulations made it possible to predict that the rest of this ordinary matter should be located in the large-scale structures that form the "cosmic web" at temperatures between 100,000 and 10 million..

  • 19 Days ago
  • 152 Views
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How fish intake by pregnant women helps in the development of a child's brain

An explanation for the correlation between eating fish during pregnancy, and the health of the baby's brain, has been uncovered by a group of researchers. Dietary lipid contains fatty acids such as omega-6 and omega-3, which are essential nutrients for many animals and humans. The research group found that a balanced intake of lipids by pregnant women is necessary for the normal brain formation of the unborn child.

  • 20 Days ago
  • 64 Views
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Grand Canyon is so old that even dinosaurs roamed on it

The western Grand Canyon is so old that dinosaurs could have seen it, according to a new analysis. The research indicates the canyon in Arizona was largely carved out by about 70 million years ago, making it more than seven times older than widely believed by scientists.

  • 23 Days ago
  • 515 Views
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Jeff Fox
Researcher

People who are always angry may have a smaller 'emotional brain'

People who are prone to rage attacks have smaller “emotional brains,” according to a new study based on brain scans. Researchers concluded that people with this condition, called intermittent explosive disorder, have less “gray matter”—brain tissue made of nerve cells—in the so-called frontolimbic regions of the brain, structures that regulate emotions.

  • 25 Days ago
  • 478 Views
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Nisin: A Food preservative kills cancer cells

Scientists from University of Michigan report that Nisin, a naturally occurring food preservative that grows on dairy products, delivers a one-two punch to two of medicine's most lethal maladies: cancer and deadly, antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  • 25 Days ago
  • 294 Views
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