Chaotic times: When stars loom into the Earth

Astrophysicists are using new methods to simulate the common-envelope phase of binary stars, discovering dynamic irregularities that may help to explain how supernovae evolve.

  • 1 Years ago
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Osmar Veras
Other

Ancient Mars was not wet but covered with ice, study claims

Mars may well have had plentiful water billions of years ago—but it was mostly ice, not liquid, a study claims. Researchers say a cold and icy planet billions of years ago better explains water drainage and erosion features seen on the Red Planet today.

  • 1 Years ago
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Jeff Fox
Researcher

Computer simulation shows that Earth's early ecosystems were more complex than thought

Scientists have used computer simulations to work out how a strange 555-million-year-old creature, with no known modern relatives, ate. The result, surprising for that time period, reveals that some of the first large organisms formed ecosystems that were much more complex than previously thought, researchers claim.

  • 1 Years ago
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Daniel Victor
College Student

Evidence for how water reached Earth found in asteroid debris

Water makes up more than 66% of human body weight, and without water, we would bite the dust in a couple of days. The human mind is comprised of 95% water, blood has 82% water and lungs have 90% water. A minor 2% decrease in our body's water supply can trigger indications of lack of hydration: fluffy transient memory, issue with essential math, and trouble concentrating on littler print, for example, a PC screen.

  • 1 Years ago
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Most Earth-like worlds are yet to form

Earth came early to the party in the evolving universe, according to a new theoretical study. It concludes that only eight percent of potentially habitable planets have even formed yet. But many future civilizations may arise so late that by then, evidence for the Big Bang—the explosion-like event that gave birth to the universe—will have disappeared.

  • 1 Years ago
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Life was there on earth from very early era

Scientists say they have found evidence of life on Earth at least 4.1 billion years ago—300 million years earlier than previous research indicated. That would suggest life began shortly after the planet formed 4.54 billion years ago, and the early planet wasn’t necessarily as hellish a place as traditional books depict.

  • 1 Years ago
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