Vaccines and immunotherapeutics on the rise

Vaccines and immunotherapeutics on the rise

  • 10 Months ago
  • 437 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 1 Likes

Electronic Health Records Software License Agreements 2016

Overview: For physician practices just setting foot into the EHR arena, and for those practices transitioning to a new EHR software package, the fundamental document controlling their experience will be the EHR license agreement. The license agreement will -- or should -- determine issues such as how whether and how often the vendor may make online portions of the software unavailable for maintenance or other issues; how many people may use the software a..

  • 10 Months ago
  • 329 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes

Responsibilities of a HIPAA Privacy & Security Officer 2016

Overview: Discussions, presentation, and webinars regarding HIPAA regulations are usually addressed from the perspective of what the regulations entail, the necessity of compliance with the regulations, and the consequences of willful neglect or non-compliance. This presentation addresses HIPAA regulations from a different perspective - from a personal perspective - from the perspective of the person in charge of moving an organization or facility toward f..

  • 10 Months ago
  • 308 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes

HIPAA Under Texting and E-mail with Patients 2016

Overview: This session will focus on the rights of individuals to communicate in the manner they desire, and how a medical office can decide what is an acceptable process for communications with individuals. The session will explain how to discuss communications options with individuals so that you can best meet their needs and desires, while preserving their rights under the rules.With the new HIPAA random audit program now getting under way, and increas..

  • 10 Months ago
  • 333 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Sildim Senoy
Researcher

How does balloon burst? New research in physics

A moderately inflated rubber balloon pricked with a needle bursts into two large pieces—but if you inflate it until it explodes on its own, you get dozens of shreds.Those are among the findings of two physicists at the University of Paris Diderot, which they published Oct. 30 in the journal Physical Review Letters.While the research appears just in time for the holiday season, the authors see a serious purpose behind it.“Understanding the physics of fr..

  • 1 Years ago
  • 320 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Santanu Das
Researcher

Ramesh Raskar: Imaging at a trillion frames per second

Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography, a new type of imaging so fast it visualizes the world one trillion frames per second, so detaile...

  • 1 Years ago
  • 574 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Santanu Das
Researcher

Do they measure the light from Big Bang correctly?

When you look into the night sky, you look back in time. Moonlight, which is actually the light from Sun bounced off the lunar surface nearly two seconds ago we see it. Light from the bright star Vega left about 26 years ago. And the light from the Andromeda galaxy began its journey to our telescopes about 2 million years ago.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 650 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Sildim Senoy
Researcher

How Quantum Biology Might Explain Life’s Biggest Questions

How does a robin know to fly south? The answer might be weirder than you think: Quantum physics may be involved. Jim Al-Khalili rounds up the extremely new, ...

  • 1 Years ago
  • 1594 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 2 Likes

"Missing" waves of Einstein's theory leave scientists puzzled

Albert Einstein's theory of relativity-which uses geometry to describe how gravity shapes the universe and celestial motions-has withstood every test scientists have thrown at it. But one festering problem is starting to raise eyebrows. Einstein's elegant theory predicts a type of cosmic fluctuation known as gravitational waves. But these haven't directly shown ...

  • 1 Years ago
  • 454 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes

Vast Ocean Underlies Ice on Saturn's Moon Enceladus

A global ocean lies beneath the icy crust of Saturn's moon Enceladus, according to new research using data from NASA's Cassini space probe. Researchers concluded that the moon's distinctive, tiny wobble must be due to a body of liquid sitting beneath the outer ice shell, all the way around. This ocean layer ...

  • 1 Years ago
  • 617 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes