Controlling levels of specific gut bacteri...
California 6th grade science books: Climat...
Faster way to assess ocean ecosystem health
Kitchen utensils can spread bacteria...
Onion-like layers help this efficient new...

Webinar on HIPAA for Dummies Boot 2016

Overview: This lesson is going to get back to the basics using multiple real life scenarios and "what if's". My goal is to make this very confusing and not well explained law easy to understand for the typical staff member. I will uncover myths versus reality as it relates to this enigmatic law based on over 1000 risk assessments performed as well as years of experience in dealing directly with the Office of Civil Rights HIPAA auditors. I will also point ..

  • 6 Months ago
  • 223 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes

Review finds little evidence behind speed reading claims

Learning to speed read seems like an obvious strategy for making quick work of all the emails, reports, and other pieces of text we encounter every day. But a new report says the claims put forth by many speed reading programs and tools are probably too good to be true.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 1024 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 1 Likes
Sasikumar
Other

What is the Universe made of?

The mysterious composition of the enormous Universe still remains an unanswered puzzle. Matter known as ordinary, which makes up everything we know, corresponds to only 5% of the Universe. Approximately half of this percentage still eluded detection. Numerical simulations made it possible to predict that the rest of this ordinary matter should be located in the large-scale structures that form the "cosmic web" at temperatures between 100,000 and 10 million..

  • 1 Years ago
  • 697 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Jeff Fox
Researcher

People who are always angry may have a smaller 'emotional brain'

People who are prone to rage attacks have smaller “emotional brains,” according to a new study based on brain scans. Researchers concluded that people with this condition, called intermittent explosive disorder, have less “gray matter”—brain tissue made of nerve cells—in the so-called frontolimbic regions of the brain, structures that regulate emotions.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 969 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Osmar Veras
Other

Scientists get funding to test whether plants can learn like Pavlov’s dog

Two scientists have received funding to study whether plants can learn like Pavlov’s dog—the pooch who famously drooled on cue whenever its owner Ivan Pavlov rang a bell. Pavlov, a Russian physiologist, noticed in the 1890s that dogs would drool every time they saw not only food, but even someone who was expected to feed them.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 808 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes

Dinosaur love nests unearthed by Colorado research group

Dinosaurs engaged in mating behavior similar to modern birds, leaving fossil evidence behind in 100-million year old rocks, according to new research. Paleontologist Martin Lockley of the University of Colorado Denver led a research team that discovered what he called large “scrapes” in prehistoric Dakota sandstone in western Colorado.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 895 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Sildim Senoy
Researcher

Globular Clusters Could Nurture Interstellar Civilizations

An ideal place to look for spacefaring civilizations may be within bunches of stars called globular clusters, a study claims—because they’re tightly packed with old stars. The idea is that the stars are within communicating distance of each other, and old enough to host planets that have evolved advanced life forms.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 802 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Santanu Das
Researcher

Real life King-Kong may have been doomed by changing landscape—and own size

An ape thought to be the largest in Earth’s history died out because it couldn’t adapt or get enough food in a changing landscape about 100,000 years ago, scientists argue in a new study. The giant ape Gigantopithecus weighed an estimated 200 to 500 kg, or 400 to 1,111 pounds. That’s up to three times heavier than the largest living species of gorilla, the Eastern lowland gorilla.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 798 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes
Osmar Veras
Other

Study find promising results in treating age-related decline in muscle mass and power

Scientists say they have obtained promising results from a Phase 2 trial of a treatment against the decline in muscle mass and power associated with aging. The “proof-of-concept” trial examined the prospects for a myostatin antibody, a drug designed to counter the effects of a protein that scientists see as a culprit in muscle decline.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 633 Views
  • 1 Comments
  • 1 Likes
Sildim Senoy
Researcher

Chitchat and small talk could serve an evolutionary need to bond with others

We think of chitchat and small talk as the things people say to pass the time or kill an awkward silence. But new research suggests these idle conversations could be a social-bonding tool passed down from our ape-like ancestors.

  • 1 Years ago
  • 794 Views
  • 0 Comments
  • 0 Likes