The morphology, biomechanics, and physiological function of the suboccipital myodural connections

The morphology, biomechanics, and physiological function of the suboccipital myodural connections

www.bing.com

The myodural bridge (MDB) connects the suboccipital musculature to the spinal dura mater (SDM) as it passed through the posterior atlanto-occipital and the atlanto-axial interspaces. Although the actual function of the MDB is not understood at this time, it has recently been proposed that head movement may assist in powering the movement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via muscular tension transmitted to the SDM via the MDB. But there is little information about it. The present study utilized dogs as the experimental model to explore the MDB’s effects on the CSF pressure (CSFP) during stimulated contractions of the suboccipital muscles as well as during manipulated movements of the atlanto-occiptal and atlanto-axial joints. The morphology of MDB was investigated by gross anatomic dissection and by histological observation utilizing both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally biomechanical tensile strength tests were conducted. Functionally, the CSFP was analyzed during passive head movements and electrical stimulation of the suboccipital muscles, respectively. The MDB was observed passing through both the dorsal atlanto-occipital and the atlanto-axial interspaces of the canine and consisted of collagenous fibers. The tensile strength of the collagenous fibers passing through the dorsal atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial interspaces were 0.16 ± 0.04 MPa and 0.82 ± 0.57 MPa, respectively. Passive head movement, including lateral flexion, rotation, as well as flexion–extension, all significantly increased CSFP. Furthermore, the CSFP was significantly raised from 12.41 ± 4.58 to 13.45 ± 5.16 mmHg when the obliques capitis inferior (OCI) muscles of the examined specimens were electrically stimulated. This stimulatory effect was completely eliminated by severing the myodural bridge attachments to the OCI muscle. Head movements appeared to be an important factor affecting CSF pressure, with the MDB of the suboccipital muscles playing a key role this process. The present study provides direct evidence to support the hypothesis that the MDB may be a previously unappreciated significant power source (pump) for CSF circulation.

  • 0 Likes

  • 0 Comments